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How to Use an Electric Lift to Get an Elderly Person Off the Floor After a Fall

How to Use an Electric Lift to Get an Elderly Person Off the Floor After a Fall

Lifting your elderly loved one off the floor after a fall can be done safely and easily using an electric lift chair that gently raises them up and lets you seamlessly transfer them to a regular chair. Here’s how.
Electric Lift To Get Elderly Person Off The Floor After Fall
Electric Lift To Get Elderly Person Off The Floor After Fall
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Disclosure: Thanks to MAIDeSITe for providing me with the product for this demonstration.

Falls can unfortunately happen to elderly loved ones. If you are a caregiver for a senior and find them on the floor after a fall, using an electric lift chair can help get them up safely. 

Based on my experience working in the home medical equipment industry, I created a video demonstration walking you through this process.

Follow this guide to learn how to properly use a lift chair if your elderly family member or friend has fallen and needs assistance getting up.

Thanks to MAIDeSITe for sending me one of their electric lift chairs to use.

Fallen Senior? Lift Them Safely Using an Electric Lift

1. Check for Injuries Before Attempting to Move

The first step is to assess the situation. Make sure your loved one is not seriously injured before trying to move them with the lift chair. Look for signs like:

  • Complaints of pain or inability to move certain body parts
  • Visible wounds or bleeding
  • Potential broken bones or sprains

If you suspect a serious injury, do not attempt to move them. Call 911 instead and wait for emergency help.

2. Position the Lift Chair Near the Fallen Person

If your loved one seems generally unharmed, bring the electric lift chair nearby. These chairs are lightweight yet sturdy. As a caregiver, you should be able to maneuver one easily.

Place the lift chair on the floor close to the person. Make sure you have charged the battery recently so it has power.

electric lift elderly after fall transfer flapsPin
The chair has transfer flaps that give support sliding up.

3. Extend the Transfer Flaps

Electric lift chairs have helpful flaps that provide support sliding up. Flip these transfer flaps out on both sides before assisting your loved one onto the chair.

4. Help the Senior onto the Center of the Lift Chair

Carefully help slide or scoot your elderly family member/friend onto the center of the electric lift chair. The transfer flaps help provide stability and make it easier to get them positioned.

If they can, have them try maneuvering onto the chair themselves using the flaps while you spot them. But provide hands-on assistance as needed.

5. Use the Hand Controller to Raise the Backrest and Lift

Once centered on the chair, it’s time to start lifting. Use the hand controller first to raise the backrest gently. Then, continue pressing the up button to elevate the entire chair surface.

Watch closely to make sure your loved one remains balanced and centered as the chair lifts. Stop if needed to re-adjust.

6. Bring a Chair Next to the Lift

When the lift chair reaches an appropriate height, bring a regular chair or wheelchair alongside it. You’ll transfer your elderly loved one over to this chair.

Avoid trying to roll the electric lift chair itself. Transfer to a separate movable chair.

electric lift elderly after fall transferPin
Assist your elderly loved one when transferring from one chair to another.

7. Help Your Loved One Transfer Off the Lift

With the lift chair raised to a suitable level right next to the regular chair, you can now assist your elderly family member or friend in transferring from one to the other.

Provide physical support as needed, but let them move their own body as much as possible. Move slowly and cautiously.

8. Lower the Lift Chair and Recharge the Battery

After successfully helping your loved one transfer off the electric lift chair, check them again for injuries. Once they are safe, prepare the lift for use again if needed.

Press the down button to lower it back to floor level. Make sure to fold up the transfer flaps, too.

It’s smart to recharge the battery after any use so the lift chair is ready to go for next time. Store it in an easily accessible spot.

Infographic: Bathing Safely With Bath Lifts

Bathing Safely With Bath Lifts infographicPin
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Preventing Falls is Better

While electric lift chairs are useful for getting people up after a fall, the best solution is preventing falls in the first place. Take proactive steps to fall-proof your elderly loved one’s home. And encourage exercise to build strength and balance.

With some planning and assistance devices like a lift chair, you can manage if an occasional fall still occurs. Just remember to always put safety first.

Hopefully, this guide gives you more confidence in using an electric lift chair to safely assist your elderly family member or friend after a fall. With compassion and the right tools, you can take great care of your loved ones as their caregiver.

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Scott Grant, CSA®, SHSS®

Scott Grant, CSA®, SHSS®

With over 20 years of experience and certifications as a Certified Senior Advisor (CSA)® and Senior Home Safety Specialist (SHSS)®, Scott Grant provides reliable recommendations to help seniors maintain independence through informed product and service choices for safe, comfortable living.

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